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Educational Program
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bullet point  Overview
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The Cardiothoracic Surgery Residency Program at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center offers both a 6-year Integrated Residency program for those directly out of medical school, with 1 cardiac track and 1 thoracic track position per year for a total complement of 12 residents, and a 2-year training program for those who have completed an ACGME accredited 5-year general surgery residency, with 2 cardiac track positions and 2 thoracic track positions per year for a total complement of 8 residents. We feel the University of Pittsburgh Cardiothoracic Surgery Residency Program is one of the premier programs in the country. Through a combination of strong clinical surgeons, creative clinician scientists and the support of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and the University of Pittsburgh we can provide you with an exciting environment in not only the basics of cardiothoracic surgery but also a glimpse into the new frontiers of therapy. We are proud of our graduates who have distinguished themselves both in academic positions as well as top private practice institutions throughout the country and their continued loyalty to us reaffirms our mission of excellence.
 
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bullet point  History of the Residency Program
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The Cardiothoracic Surgery Residency Program at the University of Pittsburgh has been in existence since originally under the direction of Dr. Henry T. Bahnson, Chairman of the Department of Surgery and Director of both the General Surgery and Cardiothoracic Surgery residency programs. The first recorded graduating thoracic surgery resident was in 1980. Dr. Bahnson was the Program Director until 1987 followed by Dr. Bartley Griffith until 2001, Dr. Robert Kormos until 2005, followed by the current Program Director, Dr. James Luketich. This represents a strong, consistent history of Program Leadership with only 4 Program Directors in nearly 30 years. Originally a 2-year program, it received approval as a 3-year training program in 1987 and remained so for 10 years. Following the national norm, the Program returned to being a 2-year program and remains so today. In 1999 the Program was approved for a general thoracic track and is one of only 11 programs in the country to do so. With the addition of a thoracic track, the Program went from 2 residents per year to 3 per year. In 2005 the Thoracic Residency Program received a 5-year continued accreditation with a commendation for excellence. In 2006 the Program was approved by the ACGME RRC for a permanent increase in resident compliment to 4 residents per year for a total of 8 residents. In 2011 the Program was approved by the ACGME Thoracic RRC for a 6-year Integrated CT Residency Program and welcomed its first residents in July 2012. Since 1980 the Program has graduated 73 thoracic surgery residents and currently has 11 residents in training. 50% of the Program’s graduates have gone into academic programs following training.
 
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bullet point  Goals of the Residency Program
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• To educate and train residents to deliver superior specialized surgical care to patients with diseases of the Pulmonary, Esophageal and Cardiovascular System.

• To train residents in the necessary specialized surgical skills required for treating adult and acquired cardiac and pulmonary disease.

• To impart to trainees a scholarly approach to normal cardiovascular physiology and to the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac and thoracic disease.

• To expose trainees to the principles of clinical and basic research in cardiothoracic surgery.

• To educate trainees emphasizing the importance of lifelong learning and the art of teaching so that they may continue to impart their knowledge of cardiothoracic surgery to future trainees.
 
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